Some More of the Weirdest Ever Saturday Morning Cartoons

Even weirder than that one about Rick Moranis teaching at a school for monsters? Or even The Smurfs? Yes!

Yo Yogi! (1991)

NBC attempted to revive 1950s and ‘60s cartoon character Yogi Bear for a whole new generation. That mean giving the smooth-talking bear a makeover so he looked cool and hip for the 1990s. So instead of hanging out with Boo-Boo and Daisy Bear at Jellystone Park and stealing picnic baskets, on Yo Yogi, Yogi and friends were teenagers who wore lots of neon colored clothes, rode around on skateboards, and solved mysteries in and around the Jellystone Mall.

Mighty Ducks (1996)

Disney really tried to make “The Mighty Ducks” a major franchise in the 1990s. First, the studio produced a trilogy of live-action films about a ragtag team of adolescent hockey players. Then Disney bought an NHL expansion team in the city where Disneyland was located: the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim. Finally, in 1996, the company created a cartoon show about a hockey team called the Mighty Ducks—and they were literally ducks. Set on a duck-and-hockey-based planet called Puckworld, the muscle-bound, superhero Mighty Ducks alternated their time playing hockey and destroying evil aliens.

The New Fantastic Four (1978)

This Marvel Comics superhero squad has shown up in lots of movies and TV shows over the years. What made this one “new”? The elimination of the Human Torch, arguably the most famous member of the Fantastic Four. This NBC cartoon was legally barred from using the character, because they’d used them instead to develop a live-action primetime TV show about the Human Torch. That show never got made, but the cartoon still had to make do with a replacement character. Since Star Wars was all the rage in 1978, the show’s creators came up with a friendly, C3P-O-esque robot named H.E.R.B.I.E. (It stood for Humanoid Experiment Robot, B-type, Integrated Electronics.)

Meatballs & Spaghetti (1982)

This short-lived CBS Saturday morning cartoon was about a married couple named Meatballs (the husband) and Spaghetti (the wife). They were musicians, and they traveled around the country in a ramshackle mobile home, along with their bass player, Clyde. Oh, and their dog Woofer also drove around from gig to gig with them, because he was their drummer. (The show is so obscure that the only video we could find is an episode dubbed into German.)