Impact of Colors

Colors have a lot more impact on our daily lives than you might think. Here are some things researchers have found out about people and their perceptions and responses to colors. (This article was first published in Uncle John’s Legendary Lost Bathroom Reader.)

PINK

  • Studies have shows that people almost always believe pastries from a pink box taste better than from any other color box.”
  • People are willing to pay more for personal services (e.g., haircuts) performed by people wearing pink.
  • Men believe pink products do the best job, but don’t want to be seen buying them. However, if they think someone’s watching, they’ll choose something brown or blue.

ORANGE

  • A quick attention, getter, it communicates informality.
  • When it is used on a product, it “loudly proclaims that the product is for everyone.”

PALE BLUE

  • Pale blue can actually make people feel cooler. Designers often use it in places where men work, “because men feel 5° warmer than a woman in the same room temperature.”
  • Blue inhibits the desire to eat; in fact, researchers say, “people tend to eat less from blue plates.”
  • Because blue is associated with eating less, marketers use it to sell products like club soda, skim milk, and cottage cheese—all foods associated with dieting and weight loss.

BROWN

  • Researchers say a brown suit subconsciously communicates, “a symbol of informality that invites people to open up.” It is recommended for reporters and marriage counselors.

GRAY

  • Your eye can process gray more easily than any other color.
  • Even so, people often become prejudiced against it, especially in areas with a bleak climate.

BRONZE

  • This metallic hue often gets a negative response. Researchers say it is “useful when rejection is desired.”

GREEN

  • It’s used to sell vegetables and chewing gum. But people avoid using it to sell meat, because it reminds consumers of mold.

Uncle John's Legendary Lost Bathroom Reader